Anyone can share the experience for how to organize a team to finish a project efficiently

"Normally, the team member is not stable when I get a engineering project. Sometimes, they only do one drawing and then go to the other projects.
I make a design specification at the beginning of the project to constraint the engineering deviation, but the result isn't OK.
Can anybody can share a better solution and experience?"

asked 3/6/2012
Qiang1
Qiang

3 Answers

In my point of view, facing that situation will delay the project. But if you are working with not stable persons, they should produce enough detailed information and documentation and work in short period tasks, that could allow others to continue with the project  

Right now I'm facing that situation I got a entire 2 years old project with out, any documentation, so I have to start from -10, but the contractor started making foundations. And I have to try to understand what they where trying to do, and explain my boss why it is wrong before doing it right. I just brace myself and do my best.

One  thing is divide the project in "zones" (you put the design criteria, "the rules") if is possible, like a Lego and finally you put all pieces together if someone goes away other could absorb the work. (That could work for small projects). Better to put an extra work to the project guys than getting a new one ( but you need to pay them to make things work) like the mythical Man-Month said:
 "Adding manpower to a late software project makes it later"  but I think that if the project needs a lot of  communication it can apply.   

If the project is big enough  you need a good team and specialists (protections,cables, "software analysis", like a dedicated "ETAP" engineer to test the system for example) and that just for the power part. Then maybe others guys from mechanical or civil engineering. So try at least to find 1 experienced engineer per branch, with good commitment. Big mistakes occur when bad communication occur between the civil,mechanical and electrical engineer  ( Is like "the tale of  the ground electrode and the bulldozer").   

answered 6/19/2012 LuCG 12
LuCG
I think you need the team members committed to the project. If they are only doing one drawing and moving on, you are not going to get any consistency (and new team member will need to learn the project).

On the project constraints, it is helpful to do a high level design brief of what you intend to design – the systems covered, standards, performance requirements etc. Have the client/person requesting the project review this and agree that this is what is required. Make sure all the team know the requirements and work towards them.
answered 3/8/2012 Steven McFadyen 199
Steven McFadyen
Firstly,Make sure that your team will consentrate on one project and discuss the part of project to each and every one and distibute the equal work to among them and they find not ok with the part which are given to them than help them to learn that part because that give the better result to the organisation as well as the project and if u any other problem than you free to ask i am ready to give answer.
answered 3/7/2012 Pankil 1
Pankil

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