Is there any empirical formula for calculation of the size of a single phase power transformer

Just for design purpose!
asked 11/23/2011
leo3421
leo342

2 Answers

I was talking about the dimensions of the transformer!
answered 11/30/2011 leo342 1
leo342
You just need to estimate how much power you will need to supply by adding up each load connected to the transformer. I would then use a 70% load factor (i.e. required size = estimated load / 0.7).

Updated: 2 December 2011
Sorry, assumed you were talking about capacity. When I need physical dimensions I tend to look up on a manufacturers website or in their catalogue. I'm not sure there is an empirical formulae. Hopefully someone into transformer design may see the question and give a better answer.
answered 11/30/2011 Steven McFadyen 246
Steven McFadyen

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