Our internet address and Vanity URLs 

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addressChangeVisitors who like to type web address rather then click menus may be interested in how our URL structure works.

First the site uses no  'www'. Not sure how much of a good thing this is, but it seems to be a popular tend amongst a lot of big sites.

In addition to no 'www', all URL are converted to lower case and extension-less (i.e. no .aspx or .html at the end).  This makes the URL cleaner and possibly helps with search engine indexing.

Key elements of the site are been rearranged in a straightforward structured fashion.  Each major section can be easily accessed from the address bar by using:

myelectrical.com - this is the main gateway and home page
myelectrical.com/notes – electrical engineering notes section
myelectrical.com/questions – our questions and answer section
myelectrical.com/tools – our calculation tools and other resources
myelectrical.com/store– our for sale things

As you dig deeper into the site, the URL de get a little more involved (but not much).  If your interested, you easily investigate and see how these work by looking at your browsers address bar. 

Vanity Names

Another great feature, is our use of vanity URL to link to profile pages.  By default, profile pages have a URL of the form:

  • myelectrical.com/user-profile/userid/xxxx  (where xxxx is the user id)

 

As an alternative, users can select a vanity name, which changes the URL to this:

  • myelectrical.com/users/vanityName ( for example myelectrical.com/users/steven)

 

Selecting a vanity name is a one off action.  You can set your vanity name when editing your profile on the ‘Manage Account’ tab. 



Steven McFadyen's avatar Steven McFadyen

Steven has over twenty five years experience working on some of the largest construction projects. He has a deep technical understanding of electrical engineering and is keen to share this knowledge. About the author

myElectrical Engineering

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